JenKem Commercial Scale PEG productionJenKem Technology provides high quality activated multi-arm polyethylene glycol derivatives (PEGs) with high purity and low polydispersity.

JenKem Technology’s multi-arm PEG derivatives can be cross-linked into hydrogels. PEG hydrogels have a variety of applications in medical devices and regenerative medicine, and are especially of interest for controlled release of drugs, for 3D cell culture, and for wound sealing and healing [1].

JenKem Technology’s multi-arm star PEGs are synthesized by ethoxylation of tripentaerythritol (8ARM(TP) PEG), hexaglycerol (8ARM PEG), dipentaerythritol (6ARM PEG), pentaerythritol (4ARM PEG), or glycerol (3ARM PEG). The number of ethylene oxide units in the PEG chain may not be equal for all arms. The total molecular weight reported for the JenKem multi-arm PEGs is the sum of the molecular weights of the PEG chains on each arm. 8ARM(TP)-PEGs with tripentaerythritol core have a higher purity as evidenced by MALDI compared to the generic 8ARM-PEGs with a hexaglycerin core.

8ARM TP CORE ADVANTAGES

Multi-arm star PEG products with molecular weights and functional groups not listed in our online catalog may be available by custom synthesis. Please inquire at tech@jenkemusa.com about pricing and availability.

JenKem Technology provides GMP grade PEG derivatives and bulk orders via custom synthesis, offering the opportunity to match customers’ special quality requirements. JenKem Technology is capable of development and synthesis of a wide range of GMP PEG derivatives starting at 200g up to 40 kg or greater batches, under ISO 9001 and ISO 13485 certified quality management system, following ICH Q7A guidelines. For inquiries on cGMP production of PEG derivatives please contact us at tech@jenkemusa.com.

For global distribution, please visit link. Please click the buttons below to order directly from JenKem Technology:

3ARM PEG DERIVATIVES
3ARM PEG PRODUCT SUBSTITUTION REACTIVITY DETAILS
≥ 95% 3arm PEG Amine. Hydrogel PEG. Amine group binds to carboxylic group (-COOH) or other amine reactive chemical groups
4ARM PEG DERIVATIVES
4ARM PEG PRODUCT SUBSTITUTION REACTIVITY DETAILS
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Amine, Free Amine. Hydrogel PEG. Amine group binds to carboxylic group (-COOH) or other amine reactive chemical groups [2, 6, 8]
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Amine, HCl Salt. Hydrogel PEG. Amine group binds to carboxylic group (-COOH) or other amine reactive chemical groups [3-5]
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Carboxyl (4arm PEG Acetic Acid, 4arm-COOH, 4arm-CM). Hydrogel PEG. Carboxyl group binds to amino or other acid reactive chemical groups [7]
≥ 95% 4arm PEG SCM (4arm PEG NHS Ester). Hydrogel PEG. This is the activated form of 4ARM-COOH. [8, 9]
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Succinimidyl Glutaramide. Hydrogel PEG. SGA has a longer hydrolysis half-life compared with SCM [23].
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Nitrophenyl Carbonate. Hydrogel PEG. Carbonate linker between PEG and NHS ester; the reaction with amine groups releases p-nitrophenol which can be easily traced by UV spectroscopy.
> 90% 4arm PEG Succinimidyl Carbonate. Hydrogel PEG. Carbonate linker between PEG and NHS ester; longer hydrolysis half-life compared with SCM
> 90% 4arm PEG Maleimide. Hydrogel PEG. Maleimide is selective for thiol groups and reacts at pH 5.0-6.5. [24-27]
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Acrylate. Hydrogel PEG. Used in vinyl polymerization or co-polymerization [10, 47]
> 90% 4arm PEG Thiol. Hydrogel PEG. Selective for thiol groups under mild reaction conditions [11]
> 90% 4arm PEG Vinylsulfone. Hydrogel PEG. VS binds free thiol groups in aqueous buffer between pH 6.5~8.5 at room temperature [12]
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Succinimidyl Succinate. Hydrogel PEG. Cleavable PEG linker. The ester linker between PEG and NHS ester enables the feature of “degradable hydrogel”. [28]
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Succinimidyl Glutarate. Hydrogel PEG. Cleavable PEG linker. The ester linker between PEG and NHS ester enables the feature of “degradable hydrogel”. [13].
> 90% 4arm PEG Isocianate. Hydrogel PEG. NCO group is useful for coupling hydroxyl through a stable urethane linker
≥ 95% 4arm PEG Azide. Hydrogel PEG. Azide group reacts with alkynes in aqueous solution catalyzed by copper [14]
4ARM PEG RAW MATERIALS
4ARM PEG RAW MATERIALS MAIN PEAK FRACTION BY GPC POLYDISPERSITY BY GPC
≥ 95% ≤ 1.05
6ARM PEG DERIVATIVES
6ARM PEG PRODUCT SUBSTITUTION REACTIVITY DETAILS
≥ 95% 6arm PEG Amine. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Amine group reacts with carboxylic group (-COOH) or other amine reactive chemical groups [15]
6ARM PEG RAW MATERIALS
6ARM PEG RAW MATERIALS MAIN PEAK FRACTION BY GPC POLYDISPERSITY BY GPC
≥ 95% ≤ 1.08
 8ARM PEG DERIVATIVES WITH TRIPENTAERYTHRITOL CORE
8ARM PEG PRODUCT SUBSTITUTION REACTIVITY DETAILS
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Amine. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Amine group reacts with carboxylic group (-COOH) or other amine reactive chemical groups . 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerol core.[16]
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Carboxyl. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Carboxyl group reacts with amino or other acid reactive chemical groups. 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerol core. [29-31]
> 90% 8arm PEG Maleimide. Crosslinks into hydrogels. MAL is selective for thiol groups on cystein side chains; reacts at pH 5.0-6.5. 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerin core. [32]
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Acrylate. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Used in vinyl polymerization or co-polymerization. 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerol core. [33]
> 90% 8arm PEG Thiol. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Selective for thiol groups under mild reaction conditions. 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerol core. [34, 35]
> 90% 8arm PEG Vinylsulfone. Crosslinks into hydrogels. VS reacts with free thiol groups in aqueous buffer between pH 6.5~8.5 at room temperature. 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerol core. [36-38]
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Succinimidyl Succinate. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Cleavable PEG linker. The ester linker between PEG and NHS ester facilitates the formation of degradable hydrogel. 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerol core. [39]
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Succinimidyl Glutarate. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Cleavable PEG linker. The ester linker between PEG and NHS ester facilitates the formation of degradable hydrogel. 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerol core. [40]
> 85% 8arm PEG Norbornene. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Norbornene NB PEGs are suitable for copper-free click chemistry reactions with tetrazines and for thiol-ene click reactions with thiols. 8ARM(TP)-PEG with tripentaerythritol core has a lower polydispersity and higher molecular weight accuracy compared with the generic 8ARM-PEG with a hexaglycerol core. [41-44]
8ARM PEG DERIVATIVES WITH HEXAGLYCEROL CORE
8ARM PEG PRODUCT SUBSTITUTION REACTIVITY DETAILS
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Amine. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Amine group reacts with carboxylic group (-COOH) or other amine reactive chemical groups [17-18]
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Carboxyl. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Carboxyl group binds amino or other acid reactive chemical groups [16]
> 90% 8arm PEG Maleimide. Crosslinks into hydrogels. MAL group is selective for thiol groups; reacts at pH 5.0-6.5.[19, 46].
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Acrylate. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Used in vinyl polymerization or co-polymerization [20]
> 90% 8arm PEG Thiol. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Selective for thiol groups under mild reaction conditions [21]
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Succinimidyl Succinate. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Cleavable PEG linker. The ester linker between PEG and NHS ester facilitates the formation of degradable hydrogel. Binds to amino group of lysine(s) or N-terminal amines [39, 45]
≥ 95% 8arm PEG Succinimidyl Glutarate. Crosslinks into hydrogels. Cleavable PEG linker. The ester linker between PEG and NHS ester facilitates the formation of degradable hydrogel [22]
8ARM PEG RAW MATERIALS
8ARM PEG RAW MATERIALS MAIN PEAK FRACTION BY GPC POLYDISPERSITY BY GPC
≥ 95%(> 90% for MW 40000 Da TP core) ≤ 1.08 (TP core) (≤ 1.12 (hexaglycerol core))

For information on heterobifunctional PEGs please visit:

MULTIARM HETEROBIFUNCTIONAL PEGs
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Founded in 2001 by experts in PEG synthesis and PEGylation, JenKem Technology specializes exclusively in the development and manufacturing of high quality polyethylene glycol (PEG) products and derivatives, and related custom synthesis and PEGylation services. JenKem Technology is ISO 9001 and ISO 13485 certified, and adheres to ICH Q7A guidelines for GMP manufacture. The production of JenKem® PEGs is back-integrated to in-house polymerization from ethylene oxide, enabling facile traceability for regulated customers. JenKem Technology caters to the PEGylation needs of the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device and diagnostics, and emerging chemical specialty markets, from laboratory scale through large commercial scale.