JenKem PEG RnDJenKem Technology provides high quality heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol derivatives (PEGs) with high purity and low polydispersity.

JenKem Technology’s heterobifunctional PEG derivatives are generally employed as crosslinking agents or as spacers between two different chemical entities. The PEG moiety in the heterobifunctional PEG derivatives provides water solubility, biocompatibility, and flexibility to the linker. Linear heterobifunctional PEG derivatives have the following general structure:

X―PEG―Y

where X and Y are two different functional reactive groups.

JenKem Technology’s multi-arm heterofunctional PEG Derivatives are also useful as linkers for Antibody-Drug Conjugates. ADCs conjugated via heterobifunctional PEGs exhibit improved water solubility and PK/PD profile.

Heterobifunctional PEG products with molecular weights and functional groups not listed in our online catalog may be available by custom synthesis. Please inquire at tech@jenkemusa.com about pricing and availability of custom heterobifunctional PEGs.

JenKem Technology provides GMP grade PEG derivatives and bulk orders via custom synthesis, offering the opportunity to match customers’ special quality requirements. JenKem Technology is capable of development and synthesis of a wide range of GMP PEG derivatives starting at 200g up to 40 kg or greater batches, under ISO 9001 and ISO 13485 certified quality management system, following ICH Q7A guidelines. For inquiries on cGMP production of PEG derivatives please contact us at tech@jenkemusa.com.

For global distribution, please visit link. Please click the buttons below to order directly from JenKem Technology:

PEG PRODUCT PURITY REACTIVITY DETAILS
≥95% Hydroxyl PEG Carboxyl (Hydroxyl PEG Acetic Acid, HO-PEG-CM, HO-PEG-COOH). COOH group is stable and can be activated [1, 2, 12]
≥95% Hydroxyl PEG Succinimidyl Carboxymethyl Ester (HO-PEG-NHS). Crosslinking reagent, the activated form of HO-PEG-COOH [3, 4]
≥95% Hydroxyl PEG Propionic Acid (Hydroxyl PEG Propanoic Acid, HO-PEG-PA). COOH group is stable and can be activated
≥95% Hydroxyl PEG Succinimidyl Propionate (Hydroxyl PEG Succinimidyl Propanoate, HO-PEG-SPA). Crosslinking reagent, the activated form of HO-PEG-PA
≥95% Hydroxyl PEG Hexanoic Acid (HO-PEG-HA). COOH group is stable and can be activated
≥95% Hydroxyl PEG Amine (HO-PEG-NH2). NH2 group is stable and can be activated [8]
≥95% Thiol PEG Carboxyl (HS-PEG-COOH, Thiol PEG Acetic Acid, HS-PEG-CM). HS is thiol reactive, while COOH is stable and can be activated [5, 6]
≥95% Thiol PEG Succinimidyl Propionate (HS-PEG-SPA). HS is thiol reactive while COOH is stable and can be activated [42]
>90% Thiol PEG Succinimidyl Glutaramide (HS-PEG-SGA). Crosslinking PEG reagent. Longer hydrolysis half-life compared to the SCM NHS PEG ester. [7]
≥95% Thiol PEG Amine (HS-PEG-NH2). HS is thiol reactive and NH2 is stable and can be activated [9]
≥95% Amine PEG Carboxyl (NH2-PEG-COOH). Both COOH and NH2 groups are stable and can be activated [10, 11, 40, 41]
≥95% TBOC Amine PEG Hydroxyl (TBOC-PEG-OH). Crosslinking PEG reagent. Tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc) protection group can be removed by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or other common acids to provide a free amine [2]
≥95% TBOC Amine PEG Amine (TBOC-PEG-NH2). Crosslinking PEG reagent. Tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc) protection group can be removed by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or other common acids to provide a free amine [13]
≥95% TBOC Amine PEG Carboxyl (TBOC-PEG-COOH, TBOC-PEG-CM, TBOC PEG Acetic Acid). Tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc) protection group can be removed by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or other common acids to provide a free amine [15]
>90% TBOC Amine PEG SCM Ester (TBOC-PEG-SCM, TBOC-PEG-NHS, ). Crosslinking PEG for ADC development. Tert-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc) protection group can be removed by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) or other common acids to provide a free amine [18]
≥95% FMOC Amine PEG Hydroxyl (FMOC-PEG-OH) Crosslinking PEG reagent. The 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) group can be removed by treatment with piperidine to release a free amine [43]
≥95% FMOC Amine PEG Amine (FMOC-PEG-NH2). Crosslinking PEG reagent. 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) group can be removed by treatment with piperidine to release a free amine [14]
≥95% FMOC Amine PEG Carboxyl (FMOC-PEG-COOH, FMOC-PEG-CM, FMOC-PEG-Acetic Acid). The 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) group can be removed by treatment with piperidine to release a free amine [16, 17]
>90% FMOC Amine PEG NHS Ester (FMOC-PEG-SCM, FMOC-PEG-NHS). The 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) group can be removed by treatment with piperidine to release a free amine [19]
>90% Acrylate PEG NHS Ester (ACLT-PEG-NHS, ACLT-PEG-SCM). Light sensitive PEG, will crosslink with exposure to ultraviolet light [20-22]
>90% Acrylate PEG Succinimidyl Propionate (ACLT-PEG-SPA). Light sensitive PEG, will crosslink with exposure to ultraviolet light
≥95% Maleimide PEG Hydroxyl (MAL-PEG-OH). Maleimide is thiol reactive and Hydroxyl is stable [23]
≥95% Maleimide PEG Amine (MAL-PEG-NH2). Maleimide is thiol reactive and Amine is stable and can be activated [24]
≥95% Maleimide PEG Carboxyl (MAL-PEG-CM, MAL-PEG-COOH). Maleimide is thiol reactive and Carboxyl is stable and can be activated [25]
>90% Maleimide PEG NHS Ester, the activated form of MAL-PEG-COOH [26-31]
>90% Biotin PEG SCM Ester. Biotin can be attached to avidin-containing surfaces or molecules; NHS ester reacts with amine groups [32]
≥95% Biotin PEG Maleimide. Crosslinking reagent for ADC development. Biotin can be attached to avidin-containing surfaces or molecules; Maleimide group is thiol reactive [33]
≥95% Biotin PEG Succinimidyl Glutaramide. Biotin can be attached to avidin-containing surfaces or molecules; SGA has a longer hydrolysis half-life compared with SCM NHS Ester [38]
>90% OPSS PEG NHS Ester. Ortho-pyridyl disulfide (OPSS) is thiol reactive; NHS ester can be reacted with Amine groups [34]
>90% Azide PEG NHS Ester. The Azide group may be reduced to amine by hydrogenolysis; Click chemistry PEG reagent for reaction with alkynes [35]
≥95% Azide PEG Amine. The Azide group may be reduced to amine by hydrogenolysis; Click PEG reagent for reaction with alkynes [36]
≥95% Alkyne PEG Maleimide. Click PEG reagent for reaction with azides [37]

Monodisperse (Discrete) Heterobifunctional PEGs

Multiarm Heterobifunctional (3ARM, 4ARM, 6ARM and 8ARM PEGs) 

Linear PEG Raw Materials (Methoxy PEG Hydroxyl and Benzyl PEG Hydroxyl)

PEG RAW MATERIAL MAIN PEAK FRACTION BY GPC  POLYDISPERSITY BY GPC
≥95% ≤ 1.05-1.10
≥95% ≤ 1.05

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Founded in 2001 by experts in PEG synthesis and PEGylation, JenKem Technology specializes exclusively in the development and manufacturing of high quality polyethylene glycol (PEG) products and derivatives, and related custom synthesis and PEGylation services. JenKem Technology is ISO 9001 and ISO 13485 certified, and adheres to ICH Q7A guidelines for GMP manufacture. The production of JenKem® PEGs is back-integrated to in-house polymerization from ethylene oxide, enabling facile traceability for regulated customers. JenKem Technology caters to the PEGylation needs of the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device and diagnostics, and emerging chemical specialty markets, from laboratory scale through large commercial scale.